Sweet Warabimochi sprinkled with kinako and swimming in kuromitsu syrup in a ceramic bowl sitting on a patterned wood tray.

Sweet Warabimochi


Delight in the Authentic Flavors of Sweet Warabimochi made with Wasanbon – A Traditional Japanese Sweet with a Chewy Twist!

Indulge in the delightful flavors of traditional Japanese cuisine with my irresistible Sweet Warabimochi recipe. This exquisite sweet treat combines the unique textures of warabiko, a bracken starch, and the subtle sweetness of wasanbon, a powdered brown sugar. Warabimochi, a beloved Japanese dessert, has a fascinating history deeply rooted in the country’s culinary traditions.

Warabiko, derived from the edible starch found in bracken ferns, lends its distinct chewy texture to the delicate Warabimochi. With its earthy aroma and smooth consistency, it adds a touch of authenticity to this delectable dessert. Wasanbon, made from highly refined sugarcane juice, is renowned for its delicate flavor profile and fine powdery texture. This premium powdered brown sugar enhances the sweetness of the Warabimochi, creating a harmonious balance of flavors.

The preparation of this delightful confection begins by combining warabiko with water, creating a thick gel-like mixture. Once cooked, the warabiko mixture is allowed to cool before the dissolved wasanbon syrup is gently stirred in. The mixture is then heated again, ensuring the syrup is well incorporated, resulting in a smooth and glossy texture. Finally, the sweetened Warabimochi mixture is poured into a pan, left to set, and then cut into bite-sized pieces.

Wasanbon syrup mixing into warabimochi

The end result is a delectable dessert that captivates the senses. Warabimochi is known for its delightful chewiness and subtle sweetness that tantalizes the taste buds. The combination of warabiko and wasanbon creates a unique and delightful dessert experience that is sure to impress both friends and family.

I invite you to embark on a culinary adventure with my delightful Sweet Warabimochi recipe. Experience the unique combination of warabiko’s chewy texture and the delicate sweetness of wasanbon. This traditional Japanese dessert is a true delight for the senses. Give it a try and let me know what you think in the comments section below. I would love to hear about your experience with this authentic sweet treat. Don’t miss the opportunity to indulge in the flavors of Japan and share your thoughts. Happy cooking and savoring!

 

Sweet Warabimochi

Indulge in the delightful flavors of traditional Japanese cuisine with our irresistible Sweet Warabimochi. This exquisite sweet treat combines the unique textures of warabiko, a bracken starch, and the subtle sweetness of wasanbon, a powdered brown sugar. Prepare the warabiko mixture, let it cool, and then stir in the dissolved wasanbon syrup. Heat the mixture again until smooth and glossy before pouring it into a pan to set. Once firm, cut into bite-sized pieces and savor the delightful chewiness and subtle sweetness of this authentic Japanese dessert.

PREP COOKING YIELD
150 mins 15 mins Serves 9
PREP 150 mins
COOKING 15 mins
YIELD Serves 9
Sweet Warabimochi sprinkled with kinako and swimming in kuromitsu syrup in a ceramic bowl sitting on a patterned wood tray.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup warabiko (bracken starch)
  • 1 cup wasanbon (powdered brown sugar)
  • 5 cups water

Toppings (to taste):

  • kinako
  • kuromitsu (brown sugar syrup or molasses) (not shown)

Warabiko on the Left and Wasanbon on the right are the two key ingredients on this Ingredient Board

Instructions:

  • Before preparing, line a square or rectangular pan with plastic wrap.
  • Combine the warabiko with the water in a mixing bowl and mix with a fork or a beater until the lumps are all dissolved.
  • Pour the mixture into a non-stick pan and stir continuously with a wooden spoon over low heat for 7-10 minutes until the mixture thickens to a pudding like consistency and becomes translucent.

Thickened warabiko amd water in a pan with a wooden spoon

  • Remove from the heat and set aside.
  • Dissolve the sugar in a saucepan in 2 TBSP water over low heat.  Stir until completely dissolved.

Wasanbon, Japanese powdered brown sugar, prepared as a syrup

  • Pour the syrup into the warabiko mixture, heat over low temperature and stir until the mixture is completely combined and even colored throughout.

Cooked warabimochi mixed with wasanbon syrup in a saucepan

  • Allow the mixture to cool for a couple of minutes and then pour into the pan you prepared earlier.  Allow to cool for 15 minutes, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least two hours to allow the warabimochi to set.

Sweet warabimochi covered with plastic wrap for refrigeration

  • Serve refrigerated or warm to room temperature.  Dust with Kinako and add Kuromitsu if desired.

Sweet Warabimochi with Kuromitsu and Kinako in the background.

Notes:

  • When mixing the warabiko and water, make sure to stir well to avoid any lumps in the mixture.
  • Grease the container or mold lightly before pouring the warabimochi mixture to make it easier to remove once set.
  • For a more intense flavor, consider adding a few drops of flavor extracts such as matcha or yuzu to the warabimochi mixture before it sets.
  • Serve the Wasanbon Warabimochi chilled for a refreshing treat, or at room temperature for a softer texture.
  • Garnish the Warabimochi with kinako (roasted soybean flour) or kuromitsu (brown sugar syrup) for additional flavor and visual appeal.

 

Related Recipes

Leave a Reply